GLOBAL CEO, ENTREPRENEUR, PROFESSOR, AND MENTOR

Category: News

March 12, 2018

Everyday MBA Podcast Interview

Episode 142 – Derek Lidow speaks with Kevin Craine about his new book “Building on Bedrock” and what self-made million-dollar entrepreneurs like Sam Walton and Walt Disney can teach us about building valuable companies. Derek is a best-selling author and teaches Entrepreneurship at Princeton University. You’ve seen him in places like the New York Times, Wall Street Journal and Forbes. Listen for three action items you can use to take advantage of the ideas and advice in this interview.

Link
March 9, 2018

Sam Walton Centennial Celebration planned at Walmart Museum

The celebration also includes a reading April 29 from author Derek Lidow, professor of entrepreneurship at Princeton. He will visit the museum and read passages from his latest book, “Building on Bedrock: What Sam Walton, Walt Disney, and Other Great Self-Made Entrepreneurs Can Teach Us About Building Valuable Companies.” The book examines entrepreneurship, with Walton being one of Lidow’s main examples.

Link
March 8, 2018

Entrepreneurship for Company Leaders

At crucial decision points for growing a business, leaders often find themselves in the position of fledgling entrepreneurs. They may have been tasked with launching a new business, entering a new market where past experience doesn’t apply, running a recent acquisition, or finding ways to revitalize an ailing product line. They may even have been encouraged to be entrepreneurial by the boss or the board. In those cases and others they can get ahead of the game by doing three things:

Link
February 21, 2018

Which Type of Entrepreneur Are You: Bedrock or High-Risk?

Entrepreneurs come in all shapes and sizes, from all kinds of backgrounds, and with many different types of personalities. But there are two, and only two, entrepreneurial mindsets that lead to successful business creation: what I call bedrock and high-risk entrepreneurship. Each is internally consistent, springing from a distinctive set of tightly intertwined motivations. And they are mutually exclusive, calling for dramatically different approaches to key business decisions.

Link
February 9, 2018

99 Thought Leaders Share the 5 Most Important Things Needed to Become a Thought Leader

Bestselling author Derek Lidow has long demonstrated the rare ability to operate successfully in corporate, entrepreneurial, and academic environments. He is an experienced and successful global CEO, a researcher, an innovator, and a startup coach. Today, teaching at Princeton University, he has inaugurated a campus-wide “design thinking” curriculum and works with Princeton’s aspiring entrepreneurs and their young companies.

Link
January 23, 2018

Startups as a CEO Second Act

Long-time CEOs looking for a second act in their business lives often tell me that they are toying with the idea of entrepreneurship but hesitate to make the leap. They worry that they’re too much the organization man or woman, not the rugged individualist of startup lore. They fear failure, which they have rarely experienced in their careers. Or they doubt their ability to keep up with the twenty-somethings they read about in breathless accounts of startup success.

Link
January 23, 2018

Getting at the Real Why

A strong core motivation, is always present with great entrepreneurs, but rarely with entrepreneurs who muddle through. Uncovering and understanding those deeper motives is the first step toward succeeding as an entrepreneur or discovering that you are not cut out for its punishing demands—the personal sacrifices, inevitable setbacks, relentless work, crushing time pressure, financial uncertainty, and sleepless nights faced by 99 percent of entrepreneurs. You need to know whether your motivations are strong enough to carry you through an experience that can certainly be exhilarating, but also exhausting, calling on your deepest reserves of personal strength.

Link
January 23, 2018

The Truth About Entrepreneurship

It’s time we told the truth about entrepreneurship. A lot depends on it. Over $530 billion, yes billion, is spent on launching startups every year. Most of that money comes directly out of the entrepreneurs’ pockets, or from the equity in their houses, or from debt. Much of it also comes from gifts, loans, or investments from friends and family. Only 10 to 20% of this money, depending upon the year and the state of frenzy in venture investing, comes from complete strangers and professional investors. Most of this money is wasted by ill-prepared entrepreneurs who have virtually no chance of success. And it will continue to be wasted, along with the time and effort that many hard working people put into these doomed enterprises, unless we can introduce them early on to the truth about what it takes to create and sustain a new business.

Link
January 22, 2018

Weathering Crises in a Young Company

If you’re the chief executive of a young company, you will at some point almost certainly face an existential crisis that threatens to take your business under. I know I did during my time as the CEO of iSuppli, an electronics market information company I founded in 1999. Over the ensuing four years, a series of crises brought the company to the brink of extinction—crises that typify the threats young companies often face. How our company weathered those storms provide some useful lessons in company preservation, including these three.

Link